How to do exponential and logarithmic curve fitting in Python? I found only polynomial fitting


Question

I have a set of data and I want to compare which line describes it best (polynomials of different orders, exponential or logarithmic).

I use Python and Numpy and for polynomial fitting there is a function polyfit(). But I found no such functions for exponential and logarithmic fitting.

Are there any? Or how to solve it otherwise?

1
119
3/12/2013 7:17:34 PM

Accepted Answer

For fitting y = A + B log x, just fit y against (log x).

>>> x = numpy.array([1, 7, 20, 50, 79])
>>> y = numpy.array([10, 19, 30, 35, 51])
>>> numpy.polyfit(numpy.log(x), y, 1)
array([ 8.46295607,  6.61867463])
# y ≈ 8.46 log(x) + 6.62

For fitting y = AeBx, take the logarithm of both side gives log y = log A + Bx. So fit (log y) against x.

Note that fitting (log y) as if it is linear will emphasize small values of y, causing large deviation for large y. This is because polyfit (linear regression) works by minimizing ∑iY)2 = ∑i (YiŶi)2. When Yi = log yi, the residues ΔYi = Δ(log yi) ≈ Δyi / |yi|. So even if polyfit makes a very bad decision for large y, the "divide-by-|y|" factor will compensate for it, causing polyfit favors small values.

This could be alleviated by giving each entry a "weight" proportional to y. polyfit supports weighted-least-squares via the w keyword argument.

>>> x = numpy.array([10, 19, 30, 35, 51])
>>> y = numpy.array([1, 7, 20, 50, 79])
>>> numpy.polyfit(x, numpy.log(y), 1)
array([ 0.10502711, -0.40116352])
#    y ≈ exp(-0.401) * exp(0.105 * x) = 0.670 * exp(0.105 * x)
# (^ biased towards small values)
>>> numpy.polyfit(x, numpy.log(y), 1, w=numpy.sqrt(y))
array([ 0.06009446,  1.41648096])
#    y ≈ exp(1.42) * exp(0.0601 * x) = 4.12 * exp(0.0601 * x)
# (^ not so biased)

Note that Excel, LibreOffice and most scientific calculators typically use the unweighted (biased) formula for the exponential regression / trend lines. If you want your results to be compatible with these platforms, do not include the weights even if it provides better results.


Now, if you can use scipy, you could use scipy.optimize.curve_fit to fit any model without transformations.

For y = A + B log x the result is the same as the transformation method:

>>> x = numpy.array([1, 7, 20, 50, 79])
>>> y = numpy.array([10, 19, 30, 35, 51])
>>> scipy.optimize.curve_fit(lambda t,a,b: a+b*numpy.log(t),  x,  y)
(array([ 6.61867467,  8.46295606]), 
 array([[ 28.15948002,  -7.89609542],
        [ -7.89609542,   2.9857172 ]]))
# y ≈ 6.62 + 8.46 log(x)

For y = AeBx, however, we can get a better fit since it computes Δ(log y) directly. But we need to provide an initialize guess so curve_fit can reach the desired local minimum.

>>> x = numpy.array([10, 19, 30, 35, 51])
>>> y = numpy.array([1, 7, 20, 50, 79])
>>> scipy.optimize.curve_fit(lambda t,a,b: a*numpy.exp(b*t),  x,  y)
(array([  5.60728326e-21,   9.99993501e-01]),
 array([[  4.14809412e-27,  -1.45078961e-08],
        [ -1.45078961e-08,   5.07411462e+10]]))
# oops, definitely wrong.
>>> scipy.optimize.curve_fit(lambda t,a,b: a*numpy.exp(b*t),  x,  y,  p0=(4, 0.1))
(array([ 4.88003249,  0.05531256]),
 array([[  1.01261314e+01,  -4.31940132e-02],
        [ -4.31940132e-02,   1.91188656e-04]]))
# y ≈ 4.88 exp(0.0553 x). much better.

comparison of exponential regression

167
3/18/2017 1:59:17 PM

You can also fit a set of a data to whatever function you like using curve_fit from scipy.optimize. For example if you want to fit an exponential function (from the documentation):

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy.optimize import curve_fit

def func(x, a, b, c):
    return a * np.exp(-b * x) + c

x = np.linspace(0,4,50)
y = func(x, 2.5, 1.3, 0.5)
yn = y + 0.2*np.random.normal(size=len(x))

popt, pcov = curve_fit(func, x, yn)

And then if you want to plot, you could do:

plt.figure()
plt.plot(x, yn, 'ko', label="Original Noised Data")
plt.plot(x, func(x, *popt), 'r-', label="Fitted Curve")
plt.legend()
plt.show()

(Note: the * in front of popt when you plot will expand out the terms into the a, b, and c that func is expecting.)


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